Go For the...

Higher Road
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Videos

These short videos will encourage you, motivate you, and challenge you to live and lead the epic life of a Vanilla Buster!

Podcasts

Every week you will be able to hear a new podcast by Dwight. These are typically 3 – 5 minutes long and you will also find the transcript of the podcast.

Articles

Once a week (normally Tuesday morning) you will receive your High Octane for the Mind article. This is the complete transcript of the podcast for the week.

He had every reason to remain in the lowlands of soft and easy living. Born into an affluent and prestigious New England family, beset with many childhood infirmities; he could have easily thrown in the towel of extraordinary living. But Theodore Roosevelt refused to live life pitying himself or to settle for less than the best life had to offer. His attitude toward taking the higher road is perhaps best reflected in one of his most memorable quotations:

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled or where the doer of the deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who does actually try to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, and spends himself in a worthy cause; who, at the worst, if he fails, at least fails daring greatly. Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.”

The higher road. It isn’t easy. It isn’t quick. It isn’t safe. And there are so, so many good reasons not to take it. But the alternative is to just play safe, eliminate all daring, and remain entrenched in lowland comforts. In other words, to settle for existence rather than life and to “live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat”.

Interestingly this same President Roosevelt understood well the lure of vanilla living. In a letter from 1917, he writes, “The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first and love of soft living and the get-rich-quick theory of life.” Wow.1917…things haven’t changed much, have they? But fortunately, the higher road is still open for all of us…regardless of how old we are…how badly we have failed…or how comfortable we have become. Roosevelt and a myriad of higher road travelers beckon us to follow in their footsteps. Let’s not disappoint them.

Flashpoint: Go for the higher road – leave the lowlands to others.

Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.

— Theodore Roosevelt